Books and Tea – A Natural Combination

tea cup and books

We love to curl up with a good book and a great cup of tea anytime, but especially when its cold outside.

As the weather reminds us that it is winter, there is nothing more comforting than curling up with a book and a cup of tea. When those books incorporate tea, it’s even better. So here are just a few of our suggestions that don’t make it on the stereotypical lists of books or authors associated with tea. There are plenty more out there.

The Importance of Living by Lin Yutang – Even though it was first published in 1939, it still reflects the Chinese philosophy of life. This book gives Westerners a distilled and clean view into Chinese thought on life and what is important. Of course, tea is touched upon in this book. The best tea quote from the book:  “There is something in the nature of tea that leads us into a world of quiet contemplation of life.”

Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoyevsky – This wickedly critical view of society and man is not always a page turner. It requires you to take time to think about what the main character said. However, this book is considered a literary classic for its shift in how a person sees them self and society in the late 1800’s. So sometimes, you push through a book to see why it is considered important and in doing so, you find its relevance and a few hidden gems. Not to mention, we have all had days like the main character where we have also thought “I say let the world go to hell, but I should always have my tea.”

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams – This lighthearted science fiction novel is easy to get lost in as you travel with the main character, Arthur, a Brit, across the universe. One of the funny parts, especially for tea drinkers, is when Arthur is analyzed by a computer and then presented with a “cupful of liquid that was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike a cup of tea.” How many times have you been presented with a cup of “tea” and wondered at how that could really be called tea?

So curl up with your favorite book and a cup of tea, and send us your recommendations for books that include tea in the story line.

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Driving in China: Making the Trip to the Tea Fields

“When overseas you learn more about your own country, than you do the place you’re visiting.” – Clint Borgen

Moped covered in Styrofoam boxes.

Wild and crazy methods for transporting goods in China.

Driving in China is much harder than driving here. We complain a lot about traffic here in Northern Virginia, but we have very few traffic problems in comparison to China. Our recent trip through Fujian and Guangdong, made the morning commute on Route 7 look like a leisurely stroll through a park. Here are some of our observations about traffic in China and few pointers if you ever feel like venturing through this country.

  • Defensive driving is the standard in China. Outside the largest of cities, roads are shared with bicycles, mopeds, pedestrians, and animals. This wide range of travelers and speeds create a chaotic group of stop and go traffic at a volume that far exceeds any metropolitan area in the US. The large cities have banned bicycles, animals and mopeds. While this improves the flow of traffic, the shear volume of cars, buses and trucks on the roads create almost constant traffic jams. In areas with high pedestrian traffic, it is common to see roadways congested with people because the sidewalks are full. The drivers slowly inch along behind the walkers acknowledging they are far out numbered.
  • For all the appearance of chaos, there were few visible accidents. Everyone and everything travels with a trust that their fellow travelers will do them no harm. Merges occur in a fashion that we would consider rude and dangerous in America. Cars cut each other off and pass in a fashion that would elicit a long blaring of the horn in the US. Yet our drivers and the other drivers acted as if nothing wrong had occurred. There were no horns, cussing or anger. It may help that most of the speed limits are low in comparison to the United States. However, you sense there is a deeper philosophy shared by the Chinese concerning behavior in crowds.
  • Double solid yellow stripes are optional. Rarely do you appreciate the American attitude that you cannot trust other people while driving, than on your way up the mountain side as your driver, along with several others, cross a double yellow line on a blind curve to pass a tour bus. There were no shoulders, extra lanes or curbs, just a straight drop down. Yet, what we saw was that the oncoming traffic slowed and/or stopped to allow this type of passing to occur. This behavior was witnessed over and over headed to various tea fields. Lets just say tea never tasted so good at the end of a trip.
Moped with husband, wife, and child.

An all too common sight of the family commuter vehicle in China.

To put it bluntly, do not drive in China if you are American. Their mass transit is wonderful and easy to navigate, even if you do not speak Chinese. There are plenty of affordable driving services that can get you around cities. From private drivers that often speak English, to taxis and the Chinese version of Uber, Didi. Just always travel with the addresses you need to go to in Chinese, including the hotel you are staying at.

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Tea Drunk and Recurring Beliefs about Tea from China

Tea Cupping

It’s hard not to get tea drunk when exploring tea in China.

Traveling throughout tea country in China presents not only the opportunity to see the tea and how it is made up close, but to sample it over hours of conversation with growers and producers. Those conversations leave you with a different perspective not only about the tea itself, but proper consumption practices through the eyes of its makers. As you talk with different growers and producers in different regions you start to find common themes from all of them. Below are just 3 of themes that just keep recurring:

  • You can get “tea drunk”. Yes, you read that right, tea drunk. So the symptoms of being tea drunk include foggy thinking, nervousness and a stomach ache. Usually this is prevented by making sure one has eaten before drinking tea or by limiting the consumption of tea. Now a tea maker is going to have a tough time limiting tea consumption, especially during a harvest period, so timing breaks during the day with no tea consumption is critical. Also, some of the makers talked about the best time to taste tea being in the afternoon after lunch, when supposedly your taste buds and brain are functioning at their best.
  • Novice tea drinkers should be served weaker tea. Knowing whether or not your guest is a routine tea drinker and their favorite types of teas influences how much tea you put in the pot. This was totally eye opening the first time we heard it. Indeed, in China it is very important to not overwhelm a guest with a flavor profile they might not understand or appreciate. The tea can be cut by as much as half or just by a third for the first serving to watch the response of the guest and then increased to full intensity in subsequent servings.
  • Tea is medicine. Tea, having been consumed for centuries in this country, is talked about as a cure for digestive issues, blood thinner and cholesterol remover, preventer of cold and flu, and general cure-all. Medical studies in both the East and West are slowly catching up with the cultural beliefs and beginning to prove or disprove many of them. However, this view of tea as medicine is reflective of the overall cultural belief that what you put in the body daily is critical to health.

The big take away, not surprisingly, is that there is still much we can all learn and explore when it comes to tea.

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3 Teas to Pair with Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin Pie is Great with Tea!

Tea makes an easy and wonderful accompaniment to your pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving. It will help you digest everything you ate for the day and compliment one of the best courses. Below we highlight 3 teas to pair with pumpkin pie and even suggest a few for apple or cherry pie. Don’t worry, we have even put in a caffeine free option.

  • Jasmine green tea is a unique and amazing pairing with pumpkin pie. The floral notes of the tea blend with the sweetness and spicing of pumpkin pie. They compliment each other nicely. Cherry and Apple pie also go nicely with this tea.
  • Lapsang Souchong is another unique tea that pairs well with pumpkin pie. The smokiness of the tea tones down the sweetness of the pie while not overpowering the spiciness. The bold flavors and mouth feel of Pumpkin pie is what makes this a nice pairing. Other fruit pies maybe overpowered by this tea.
  • If you are not feeling adventurous, Nilgiri tea makes a perfect companion since it is both floral yet strong enough to hold its flavor with pumpkin pie. This beautiful black tea from southern India allows you to serve something unique without straying too far out of guests comfort zones.
  • Ginger Honeybush when drunk with Pumpkin pie creates a lemon citrus flavor when combined in your mouth that is also smooth. This surprising combination adds an unexpected twist to the Pumpkin pie that is refreshing. If this is too adventurous, Rooibos is just fine.

Don’t forget you can pair tea with other courses on your Thanksgiving menu. The idea is that the tea and food item compliment each other without having one flavor over power the other. You can find some ideas in our post on 3 unusual tea and food pairings.

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Entertaining Guests: Brewing Tea for a Large Crowd

Large batch of ice tea.The holidays bring people together over food and drinks like no other time of year. So when faced with entertaining a large crowd, how do you keep the tea flowing? Preparing fresh brewed iced tea for a large crowd is really quite simple. Note the required equipment. You can do this with what you generally have at home. However, if you are a routine entertainer, we’ve provided some pointers on what to pick up at restaurant supply stores or online that will make your life easier.

The instructions below are for preparation of fresh brewed loose leaf iced tea that is stored at room temperature in a pitcher or large container, ready to pour for guests over ice. You can also make cold brewed iced tea for guests

Equipment for fresh brewed iced tea:

  • You need a pitcher that you are fine with sitting out on the counter all day. A pitcher with a lid is best, but you can do this with an open pitcher. Generally you will find half gallon pitchers at most stores. You will find gallon pitchers at restaurant stores, which come in very handy when your guest count goes over 15 people.
  • You need a large pot to boil water in, it should hold at least 4 quarts.
  • A thermometer to measure water temperature if you plan on brewing anything other than black or tisane tea.
  • Wire Mesh Strainer (the finer the mesh the better).

Instructions for brewing:

  • Add 8 1/4 cups of water, a little over 1/2 gallon of water, to your pot and turn the burner on to high.
  • Allow the water to come to a boil and then add 1 cup of loose leaf tea. Turn the burner off.
  • If brewing a white, green or oolong tea, turn off the burner and remove the pot from the burner. Allow to cool for about 3 minutes and then put in your thermometer, you are looking for 190 degrees before adding the tea. If using voluminous white tea make this 1 1/3 to 2 cups.
  • For black or tisane tea, allow to steep for 5 minutes. For an oolong tea, allow to steep for 4 minutes. For a green or white tea, allow to steep for 3 minutes.
  • Pour the tea through the strainer into your pitcher and leave on the counter.
  • Serve the tea directly over ice. Since the tea is at room temperature and concentrated, a good amount of ice is expected to melt.
  • Since the tea will have sat out all day, you should discard any unused tea at the end of the day, especially if it was in an open pitcher. Feel free to water your plants with it. As long as there is no sugar in it, they will love you for it.
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